Dental bonding is a special cosmetic dentistry process that applies a tooth shade resin material to the patient’s tooth to restore function and stability. The tooth colored resin is hardened through the use of a special curing light, which adheres the resin to the tooth helping to improve the client’s smile. The resin bonding material used by Dr. Ueckert is specifically created to be invisible on teeth and is blended to closely match the client’s natural tooth color.  After being polished, the bond will appear shiny and luminescent, behaving just as the tooth enamel does.

Dental Bonding - General DentistryBonding resin used in cosmetic dentistry is a very flexible material.  It allows for expansion and contraction of the natural tooth, which helps to prevent cracks and tooth loss.  Procedures like dental bonding are rather intricate jobs that require the skilled hands of an experienced dental professional.  The dental bonding procedure is ideal for many minor cosmetic changes.

Dental Bonding Applications

Dr. Ueckert uses dental bonding to:

  • Close gaps or spaces between teeth
  • Protect against advanced tooth decay
  • Repair chipped or cracked teeth.
  • Correct appearance of discolored teeth
  • Protects roots of teeth that are exposed when gums recede
  • Change the shape or length of teeth
  • Provide a cosmetic substitute to amalgam fillings

Increasingly, we are seeing more uses for dental bonding as an alternative to more costly and “invasive” dental porcelain restorations. We have seen patients choose dental bonding for two main reasons.  First, the cost can be lower, while achieving all or most of the more expensive options.  Secondly, dental bonding is “additive”, which means it can be placed on or over natural tooth structure without much of the destructive grinding away of tooth necessary with porcelain veneers or crowns. Special techniques have recently been developed which allow Dr. Ueckert to accurately and quickly place dental bonding on multiple teeth, which is extremely useful for solving complex functional and cosmetic dental problems.  By carefully considering all options, you can make an informed choice as an empowered patient.

Dental Bonding Video Education

Dental Bonding Process

Dental Bonding Services, offered from Dr. Ueckert, consist of a series of steps to achieve proper results

Preparation Process

Getting a tooth bonded requires a little preparation. Anesthesia may not be a necessary prerequisite unless the process is used to seal a decayed tooth.  A shade guide selection chart is used to determine the composite resin color that most closely matches the shade of your teeth.

Bonding the Tooth

First the surface of the tooth is prepared for dental bonding by light roughening, after which a conditioning gel is applied with the bonding primer. Next the tooth-colored, putty like resin is applied, molded and smoothed to the desired shape to suit the tooth. The composite can be applied in multiple layers to emulate the depth of the natural tooth.  A high intensity ultraviolet light is then flashed on the tooth for the purpose of hardening the material. Once the bond hardens, Dr. Ueckert will trim and shape the tooth, polishing it to match the sheen of the rest of the teeth.

When shaping is done, it’s common to experience tooth sensitivity.  This can persist for several weeks, but should gradually lessen over time.

Dental Bonding:  Care and Tips

While technology has brought about many advancements in dental bonding and composite materials, there are limitations to understand. Simply following standard oral hygiene practices is a good start:  brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss at least once a day and see your dentist for regular professional check-ups and cleanings.  Avoid harsh toothpastes and brushes, they can cause the bonding to dull and be more susceptible to stain.  Because bonding material can chip, it is important to avoid habits like biting fingernails; chewing on pens, ice, or other hard food objects; or using your bonded teeth as an opener.  If you do notice any sharp edges on a bonded tooth or if your tooth feels odd when you bite down, call your dentist.